Revisiting and discovering the ties that bind us

When we revisit a favorite place, we expect the same magic we found on our first visit. Of course, every visit is a little different, and, usually, knowing what’s around the next bend in the trail turns into a comfortable experience of remembering why we so loved this place and returned. So that’s how it went with our return to a beautiful area on Vancouver Island, East Sooke Regional Park. However, this visit presented a surprise and heartwarming ending for us.

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The park is an hour’s drive from Victoria and fairly remote. We parked in the lot, donated a few coins for a hiking map offered by a park volunteer, and off we went across the meadow towards the forest, and beyond, the coast.

The path alternates between scrambling over glacially-grooved stone and navigating a dirt path littered with large rocks.

The path alternates between scrambling over glacially-grooved stone and navigating a dirt path littered with large rocks.

We stopped to see the ancient  petroglyph (rock carvings) by the shore. When a bird swooped nearby, we got a wonderful view of a belted kingfisher. A vole (or was it a mouse?) scurried for cover. A snake startled us. It had just consumed some other little critter and was engorged at its front end. It slithered into the undergrowth before we could get a good photo.

The variety of tree species in the forest surprised us. We have continued snapping photos of tree bark to add to our growing collection.

The variety of tree species in the forest surprised us. We have continued snapping photos of tree bark to add to our growing collection.

Tired after a three-hour hike we made it back to the parking lot to discover a dead car battery. (Who left the lights on in the car?) We had our trusty portable battery charger. For the first time in years, it didn’t work. (Maybe since it’s 25-years old we should replace it?) So, we found ourselves in a parking lot a long way from anywhere with a dead battery, a dead spare battery, and no jumper cables. A cold feeling settled in as we wondered how could we possibly get out of this isolated parking lot.

The park volunteer came over to see what she could do to help, and Dean, a visitor from Manitoba, offered his assistance. More help arrived as jumper cables were loaned to us by workers from a Telus phone truck doing repairs a long way down the road.

Dean (left) and Joe (right) making the connection.

Dean (left) and Joe (right) making the connection.

Our hearts warmed up, as we heard our car’s ignition turn over and the engine began to purr as usual.

If you’re in a bind, what better place to be than Canada? In our experience here, Canadians are unfailingly polite and helpful. Those of us from across the border can be grateful to – and learn something from – such good neighbors! We hope to repay the favor someday.

 

August 2015

About simpletravelourway

Beth and Joe enjoy simple travel.
This entry was posted in Canada - Vancouver Island and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Revisiting and discovering the ties that bind us

  1. Cliff Mail says:

    So who did leave the lights on? I live in fear of keys dropping out of the place of safekeeping while walking in remote areas, for good reason!

    • We don’t like to embarrass Joe in front of our loyal readers, and, therefore, Cliff, we won’t answer your question. However, on the safekeeping of keys while hiking and camping, we can tell you that Joe does a very good job, ever since 1978, when he absentmindedly locked the car-keys in the car in a remote mountain area of Wyoming. Since then he puts the key on a carabiner attached to his belt. Thanks for your comment! We hope this settles the bet between you & Ruth on which of us left the headlights on.

  2. icelandpenny says:

    I’m so glad you received the help you needed.

  3. Phew, lucky you had some friendly helpers on hand.

  4. Sounds like a good way to let someone else be the nice guy, and what a perfect time for them to do it!

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