Who stalks whom?

We planned a visit to marshes, wetlands, forests, and seaside roads for a binge of bird watching. Three days seemed about right for the Delta area south of Vancouver, BC.

The “hot spot” for birds in late August (not really the best of times for spotting birds) happened to be George C Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary.  Even if you didn’t give a hoot about birds, Reifel has many scenic walking paths, making it a pleasant place for our daily walk.

We loved the illusion that the distant container ship was sailing on a sea of grass.

We loved the illusion that the distant container ship was sailing on a sea of grass.

Of course, we went there to see birds, and we did. We always enjoy seeing the colorful wood ducks.

Of course, we went there to see birds, and we did. We always enjoy seeing the colorful wood ducks.

We paid attention to anything that crossed our path, and that included the occasional small (non-poisonous) snakes, squirrels, and even bees. How often do you see two on the same tiny flower?

We paid attention to anything that crossed our path, and that included the occasional small (non-poisonous) snakes, squirrels, and even bees. How often do you see two on the same tiny flower?

We saw many birds, managed to identify 35 species, and counted 5 of those as first time seen for us. (Thirty-five is nothing compared to what others see in season.) Still, we hadn’t seen the sandhill cranes that were supposed to be here. So, we stalked about for a view of the cranes. We’d been in the park for most of the day, and, when we started to head back, a sandhill crane startled us. Surrounded by comparatively short mallards, the crane, at water’s edge, stood out.

The crane finally noticed us, ruffled its feathers, but made no attempt to leave. We stayed quietly, waiting to see what it would do.

The crane finally noticed us, ruffled its feathers, but made no attempt to leave. We stayed quietly, waiting to see what it would do.

The crane seemed to be expecting something from us and was a bit uneasy. We motioned to each other to slowly back away and allow the crane and mallards to go back to whatever they had been doing when we strolled by.

But the crane had other ideas. As we left, it followed in our tracks down the path.

But the crane had other ideas. As we left, it followed in our tracks down the path.

Now, who was stalking whom? We became edgy as the tall crane (almost 4’ tall and having a long sharp beak) continued after us, so we picked up our pace, and finally lost our stalker as we rounded a bend in the path. Whew!

We raced back to our car only five minutes before the entrance gate was to be locked for the night. As we drove away over the one-lane wooden bridge, we finally relaxed.

We raced back to our car only five minutes before the entrance gate was to be locked for the night. As we drove away over the one-lane wooden bridge, we finally relaxed.

After years of pursuing birds, this was the first time a bird had chased after us.

 

August 2015

About simpletravelourway

Beth and Joe enjoy simple travel.
This entry was posted in Canada - Vancouver and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Who stalks whom?

  1. Cliff Mail says:

    There is probably a picture of you two on the cranes Facebook page. Looks like pleasant strolling country

  2. Bernice Rowe says:

    I bet she had a nest near where you first encountered her! BSent from Yahoo Ma

  3. westerner54 says:

    I’ve had a Sandhill Crane do that to me too. I was in Yellowstone, and I kept backing up to get a decent distance away, but he kept following me. A ranger actually came up to me and gave me a warning about being too close to the wildlife. He didn’t think it was a good excuse that the danged bird was stalking me!

  4. plaidcamper says:

    What a wonderful post! Loved the ship on the sea of grass, and as for being stalked by a crane – funny.

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