Captain Cook led the way, and we followed

Captain James Cook, the British explorer and cartographer (1728-1779), really got around. As we have traveled over the years and around the globe, we discovered many places that had been explored and mapped by Captain Cook 250 years earlier.

He sailed to Newfoundland in the 1760’s and we followed in 2007.

We took a small boat, past icebergs, to Quirpon Island, Newfoundland where we stayed.

We took a small boat, past icebergs, to Quirpon Island, Newfoundland where we stayed.

When we arrived in New Zealand, Cook’s name popped up again and again as he had explored and mapped the coasts of the North, the South, and Stewart Islands on three separate voyages between 1769-1777. We traveled to all three islands ourselves in 2014.

We cruised in Doubtful Sound, first named “Doubtful Harbor” by Captain Cook.

We cruised in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand – first named “Doubtful Harbor” by Captain Cook.

On our visit to Doubtful Sound, we were told that when Cook’s ship explored New Zealand, the sound of birds was deafening.   Our ship’s captain asked us to be quiet and see what we could hear. Everyone went silent. We waited. The sound of the birds barely registered in our ears 250 years later.

In 1770 Cook landed in Botany Bay, Australia. Hey, we were not far from there in 2014.

Imagine the view Cook had of the Australian coast compared to what we saw in nearby Sydney.

Imagine the view Cook had of the Australian coast compared to what we saw in nearby Sydney.

On Cook’s third voyage he explored the west coast of what is now northern California and landed in Oregon in a place he named Cape Foulweather.

Our visit was on a foggy and very windy day which may be regular weather for that area. Thus, the name.  

Our visit was on a foggy and very windy day which may be regular weather for that area. Thus, the name.

Captain Cook and we “shared” exploration of Alaska, Vancouver Island, and the Hawaiian Islands.

We ticked off all the places we’d still need to travel to keep up with Captain Cook while we studied the map at the visitor center.

We ticked off all the places we’d still need to travel to keep up with Captain Cook while we studied the map at the visitor center.

Captain Cook died in Hawaii, killed by islanders, in 1779.   Unlike Cook, we were warmly greeted and greatly enjoyed our visit there.

 

September 2015

 

About simpletravelourway

Beth and Joe enjoy simple travel.
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9 Responses to Captain Cook led the way, and we followed

  1. 2gadabout says:

    You inspire me to get back on the road. I’ve so missed the freedom of travel that I’ve traded for the responsibility of, as Jim puts it, sticks and bricks. LOL

  2. The 1770’s! I can hardly imagine world travel at that time.

  3. Merrill says:

    Nice post. Good luck keeping up with Captain Cook.

  4. heimwee2456 says:

    I’ve always wanted to visit Australia, New Zealand & partly Antarctica, too. I find glaciers amazing, I consider it as the most beautiful creation of the Mother Nature.
    Also, I write about traveling, too, can we do follow for follow? 🙂 I know you have much more followers than me, but…
    http://www.asequibles.wordpress.com

  5. Amy Parmeter says:

    Shared this with my mom who greatly admires Cook – she loved it! Thanks for the account!

  6. Cliff Mail says:

    He was a very busy lad, most of the New Zealand coastline features were named by Cook, many of the names still exist today. Weather conditions were a common one (Cape Foulwind), crew mebers another ( Banks Peninsular after the Botanist on board, Young Nicks Head (after a Cabin boy) and, his impression of the area, Bay of Plenty, Poverty Bay, and the of course naming features after english gentry, Cape Rodney, Mount Egmont, his purpose for being in a place, Mercury bay where he observed the Transit of Mercury across the sun. His maps were incredibly accurate given the tools he had. He is a big deal in NZ history with his name popping up in many areas.

  7. icelandpenny says:

    What a lovely account. And imagine his doing all that, without the conveniences that we can today take for granted!

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