Open the door – a thought on travel photography

Huntington Gardens

The key to improving travel photography is focusing on buildings, architecture, and cityscapes. Image taken in Bodrum, Turkey.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then travellers’ photos of iconic buildings tell the tale of magical places. Some places are so recognizable that no further explanation is required, and so photogenic that it would be hard to take a bad photo.

You knew with just a glance this is Venice, Italy.

You knew with just a glance this is Venice, Italy.

You also guessed this was a Greek or Roman ruin, and it is: the ancient Greek ruins of Hierapolis in Pamukkale, Turkey.

You also guessed this was a Greek or Roman ruin, and it is: the ancient Greek ruins of Hierapolis in Pamukkale, Turkey.

When we relegate buildings to be just an out-of-focus backdrop when taking photos of loved ones, we might be missing something. So, instead of concentrating on people’s portraits in front of the buildings, why not take portraits of the buildings themselves?

When we look at this photo of a building’s interior, we see “bold,” “20th century, ” “urban,” “architecture as art.” This is the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

When we look at this photo of a building’s interior, we see “bold,” “20th century, ” “urban,” “architecture as art.” This is the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

It’s not just focusing our attention on iconic architecture. On the plains of the western U.S. we see the squat, earth-colored houses under the impossibly huge sky in Marfa, Texas.

It’s not just focusing our attention on iconic architecture. On the plains of the western U.S. we see the squat, earth-colored houses under the impossibly huge sky in Marfa, Texas.

Another favorite subject for our photography is building details unique to a region.

Everywhere we went in northern Spain we admired the terracotta roofs, so when we visited a fortress with commanding views of the countryside, we got the images we’d been waiting for. Every time we see this photo we can feel the warmth and sun of Spain.

Everywhere we went in northern Spain we admired the terracotta roofs, so when we visited a fortress with commanding views of the countryside, we got the images we’d been waiting for. Every time we see this photo we can feel the warmth and sun of Spain.

Once we opened the door to photographic studies of buildings, our travel images were enhanced with a stronger sense of place.

 

April 2016

 

About simpletravelourway

Beth and Joe enjoy simple travel.
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3 Responses to Open the door – a thought on travel photography

  1. icelandpenny says:

    bravo – and I particularly like the roof tiles in Spain

  2. SolJorn says:

    Great post. Love when you incorporate ways to improve and things you learned from your experience.

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