Visiting Angkor? (Lesson 4 for a major site.)

A visit to Angkor Wat is the trip of a lifetime. There aren’t too many other destinations in the world that rank as highly, and for many of us, it takes considerable resources to get there.

If you’re lucky enough to be going – we suggest taking four factors into consideration as you make your plans. On our first visit, we put together three valuable lessons:

Lesson One. Avoid the crowds.

Ta Prohm

Lesson Two. Take your time.

Bayon

Lesson Three. Seek out the extraordinary for you.

Banteay Srei

Now we have returned for our second visit, and we can see that we missed an important fourth lesson: mind the weather.

A macaque monkey trying to stay hydrated at Angkor Wat

No matter when you visit Angkor Wat you cannot avoid the heat. We did remember that it was hot when we last visited in the month of December (average high is 86 F/30 C) – which happens to be their coolest month of the year. Now it is even hotter in March (average high is 93 F and the weather app every day says “feels like 103 F/40 C”. Imagine touring Angkor Wat in the blazing sun in the hottest month, April (average high is 95 F/35 C)?  Our tuktuk driver told us it feels like 113 F/45 C.

The best strategy to see Angkor Wat requires adjusting your outings to the cooler mornings. Once it gets too hot, it’s time to wisely retreat. For us – to escape the oppressive heat that usually meant heading back to our air-conditioned lodging between noon and 1pm. If it fits your budget – a pool is a welcome place to spend the afternoon.

Know that working with the heat means that time each day at the Angkor Archaeological Park might be limited to the morning hours. It’s a smart traveler who understands the restrictions of touring in the high heat and humidity.  Plan accordingly!

 

March 2018

About simpletravelourway

Beth and Joe enjoy simple travel.
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7 Responses to Visiting Angkor? (Lesson 4 for a major site.)

  1. OMG was it hot and humid during our March visit! It makes getting up and out the door early a breeze though because 1) you can’t apply makeup (it melts) and 2) it’s easy to decide what to wear because, who cares? It all turns into a soggy, limp wad within an hour. 😁 And I’ve oftentimes wondered about that “feels like” add-on to the weather report. WHO decides that? As much fun as my time was in Cambodia and as difficult as it was to say goodbye, returning to cool and rainy March weather here in Portugal has been a rather welcome change! Anita

  2. Nothing wears you out like hot and humid. But, it seems that the place has such appeal you didn’t think once was enough! Glad you got a second viewing 😉

    • We quickly figured out how to handle the heat. After an active morning we’d stop and have a tall icy fruit drink, then settle down on a lounge chair by the pool. Beth rarely swims as she is averse to any water cooler than a bathtub but in Siem Reap, she managed to swim most every day. Imagine that?! It’s great how options open up in challenging situations.

  3. plaidcamper says:

    We’d love to visit, but it will be when it is relatively cooler – hot and humid is exhausting, but right now seems attractive after a Canadian winter!

  4. Phew, that is hot. Good idea to do it in the cooler months.

  5. Great tips to visit temples of Angkor!
    I was in Angkor in the cooler period of the year, in November. With about 27-30C was pleasantly warm for us coming from Europe, but our tuk tuk driver wore two layers of clothing and said it was cold. 🙂

  6. ednalvarez says:

    So funny – I saw your subject heading and immediately thought – HOT AND HUMID. And, when I was there, absolutely monsoon weather. Be prepared.

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